Graham Heights wins Graham Heights wins
Graham Heights wins
Enderly Park residents speak at the Neighborhood Campus Forum Enderly Park residents speak at the Neighborhood Campus Forum
Enderly Park residents speak at the Neighborhood Campus Forum
Working the garden in Washington Heights Working the garden in Washington Heights
Working the garden in Washington Heights
A Graham Heights resident and campus guest converse at the Community Campus Forum A Graham Heights resident and campus guest converse at the Community Campus Forum
A Graham Heights resident and campus guest converse at the Community Campus Forum
The KaBoom! Build in Reid Park The KaBoom! Build in Reid Park
The KaBoom! Build in Reid Park
Volunteers construct the KaBoom! playground in Reid Park Volunteers construct the KaBoom! playground in Reid Park
Volunteers construct the KaBoom! playground in Reid Park

CHARP publishes peer-reviewed article around our model of community university engagement

May 15, 2015

Elizabeth Morrell, Joe Howarth, and Dr. Janni Sorensen's article has been published in the Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement. The article's citation and abstract are below. We are very excited to share our experiences and support the CHARP model in other higher education contexts.

Morrell, E., Sorensen, J. & Howarth, J. (2015). The Charlotte Action Research Project: A Model for Direct and Mutually Beneficial Community–University Engagement. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 19(1), 105-132.

Abstract: This article describes the evolution of the Charlotte Action Research Project (CHARP), a community–university partnership founded in 2008 at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and focuses particularly on the program’s unique organizational structure. Research findings of a project evaluation suggest that the CHARP model’s unique strength lies in its ability to allow for the exploration of “wicked” problems that have resulted from structural and sociospatial inequality in cities because tangible issues identified by community partners become action research priorities for the CHARP team. Additionally, CHARP allows for the transcendence of the practical, logistical barriers often associated with community–university partnerships by employing graduate students as staff. It is suggested that the CHARP model provides a starting point for a unique model of engagement infrastructure at universities that goes beyond service provision and volunteerism to include community-based participatory and action-based research within a critical theory paradigm.